12 Long Blooming Plants You’ll Love

12 Long Blooming Plants You’ll Love

12 Long Blooming Plants You’ll Love

12 Long Blooming Plants You’ll Love

What’s the point of planting if your plants die within weeks or months? If you’re going through all the trouble of digging up your garden you might as well plant something with a little endurance, something that’s willing to sprout all over again once the bitter winter frost has passed.

These twelve plants could very well be your next long-lasting perennial.

1. Moonbeam (Coreopsis)

Moonbeam (Coreopsis)

Moonbeam (Coreopsis)

If we’re being honest, this one’s first because I love its name. Moonbeam grows in clumps around one to two feet tall, they are known for their density and feature yellow flowers similar to daisies.

If you shear them in the middle of summer, you’ll promote their regrowth in the fall.

2. Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia)

Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia)

Black-Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia)

This wildflower is native to Missouri and typically grows in fields, open woods, and roadsides.

It can be a bit weedy, but it blooms in a gorgeous orange to yellow hue with dark brown centers.

3. Bloody Cranesbill

Bloody Cranesbill

Bloody Cranesbill

Bloody Cranesbill begins to blossom in late spring and continues on into early summer.

The purple flowers contrast beautifully against the deep green foliage which will change to crimson in the fall months.

Bloody Cranesbill is a herbaceous perennial which needs regular waterings and partial to full sun.

4. Shasta Daisies

Shasta Daisies

Shasta Daisies

A classical pretty flower, perfect for any women’s hair, the Shasta Daisy is a larger and more robust roadside daisy.

They bloom in large clumps, up to two to three feet tall and one to two feet wide.

They return every spring or early summer depending on when you planted them and will bloom in the early fall months.

Although related to common roadside daisies, they are not an invasive species and take to cutting very well.

5. Daylilies

Daylilies

Daylilies

There are over five hundred varieties of daylilies, so some research is required to find the perfect species for your garden.

You’ll find them most in Minnesota and Florida, but they thrive in an abundance of areas.

They tolerate an impressive range of soil types, are not disturbed by pests or diseases, and bloom without fail for years without your constant hovering and attention.

6. Orion Cranesbill

Orion Cranesbill

Orion Cranesbill

A low-maintenance plant with violet flowers and deep purple veins, the Orion Cranesbill will bloom from mid-spring to early summer.

They plant best when grouped and should not be pruned until it has flowered. If you live in a particularly deer-infested area, this plant is not their favorite.

I won’t say it repels them, but it is doubtful your four-legged friends will munch on them. It has many good landscaping qualities and can be planted in containers and along borders.

7. Catmint

Catmint

Catmint

Lavender leaves hover over the small mounds created by this perennial. While similar to Catmint, Catmint is far less attractive to cats and makes for a good replacement if you don’t want your garden overrun with feline friends.

Catmint can be mass planted and can even be used as an insect deterrent when planted close to vegetables.

8. Rose Campion

Rose Campion

Rose Campion

The epitome of femininity, this flower will blossom in shades of white, magenta, and pink.

While it has become naturalized in the United States, it is actually native to the Middle East, Southern Europe, and Northern Africa.

Their first year will be slow, and the blossoms will be a tad sparse, but will become quite numerous in their second year.

Also, big thumbs up for the fact that it will reseed and regenerate itself in the years to come.

9. Pretty Woman

Pretty Woman

Pretty Woman

Pretty Woman is a variant of the tree lily. They bloom in pure white and give off a lovely scent.

It is a giant flower, which will only grow taller year after year; fully mature flowers can grow as tall as 180cm.

Due to their size and heft, their stems may require staking, but they will also take to cutting.

10. Campanula

Campanula

Campanula

You’ll see the most blooming of this flower during June and July, but can live long into October if given proper care and conditions.

These cup-shaped flowers can blossom in shades of pink and white, but will typically grow in hues of light blue and lavender.

The Campanula is tougher than it looks and can withstand cold temperatures with style.

11. Russian Sage

Russian Sage

Russian Sage

Bold would be the best word to describe Russian Sage. Its spiky mass of lavender flowers bloom from late spring and into fall.

It makes a perfect groundcover with its fragrant foliage that surrounds its flowers. It requires well-drained soil and minimal watering.

12. White Yarrow

White Yarrow

White Yarrow

Native to the Northern Hemisphere, the White Yarrow is a prairie plant. Its deep roots absorb water while also searching out phosphorus, copper, and potassium from wherever it is planted.

As a nutrient-rich plant, the White Yarrow can also be cut into mulch for other to use in your garden or added to your compost bin for a nutrient boost.

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