Beautiful Plants You’ll Barely Need to Water

Beautiful Plants You’ll Barely Need to Water

Beautiful Plants You’ll Barely Need to Water

Beautiful Plants You’ll Barely Need to Water

Whether you live in a town with expensive water (like I do), live in a drought zone, or are just trying to be a thoughtful steward of the earth’s natural resources, there are plenty of reasons to try to conserve water in your garden.  However, you may also want beautiful summer color. That’s when it’s handy to know which plants to grow that don’t require much water to maintain their health and beauty.

This article outlines eight lovely plants to grow that don’t require much watering.  And as a bonus, a couple of them also have culinary and medicinal uses.

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium)

Achillea millefolium, commonly known as yarrow /ˈjæroʊ/ or common yarrow, is a flowering plant in the family Asteraceae. It is native to temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere in Asia, Europe, and North America. It has been introduced as a feed for live stock in places like New Zealand and Australia. However, it is a weed in those places and sometimes also in its native regions.

In New Mexico and southern Colorado, it is called plumajillo (Spanish for ‘little feather’) from its leaf shape and texture. In antiquity, yarrow was known as herbal militaris, for its use in stanching the flow of blood from wounds. Other common names for this species include gordaldo, nosebleed plant, old man’s pepper, devil’s nettle, sanguinary, milfoil, soldier’s woundwort, thousand-leaf, and thousand-seal.

Lamb’s Ear (Stachys byzantina)

Lamb’s Ear (Stachys byzantina)

Lamb’s Ear (Stachys byzantina)

Lamb’s-ear plants are perennial herbs usually densely covered with gray or silver-white, silky-lanate hairs. They are named lamb’s ears because of the leaves curved shape and white, soft, fur-like hair coating. Flowering stems are erect, often branched, and tend to be 4-angled, growing 40–80 cm tall. The leaves are thick and somewhat wrinkled, densely covered on both sides with gray-silver colored, silky-lanate hairs; the under sides are more silver-white in color than the top surfaces. The leaves are arranged oppositely on the stems and 5 to 10 cm long. The leaf petioles are semiamplexicaul (the bases wrapping half way around the stem) with the basal leaves having blades oblong-elliptic in shape, measuring 10 cm long and 2.5 cm wide (though variation exists in cultivated forms). The leaf margins are crenulate but covered with dense hairs, the leaf apexes attenuate, gradually narrowing to a rounded point.

Check out 6 more plants on the next page

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